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How gender and race connect

April 3, 2012

This question of how race and gender connect (referred to in the previous blog, The power structures surrounding racialized and gendered desires) is also picked up by Clare Anderson who recently reviewed three books that are “centrally concerned with how gender as a social category works through other ascriptions and experiences of difference: class, race, religion, ethnicity.” The books “engage with the question of what kind of work categories of social difference do as they intersect with gender ideologies and practices[1] and her review is really quite interesting, but I’m only pulling out these wee statements just now.

Consider, for example, Anderson’s assertion that this work invites consideration of the ‘connection between domesticity and broader political struggles’[2] 

It’s a connection worth considering! … how do young adult fictions represent such connections?


[1] 315-316 Clare Anderson (2010) ‘(Post) Colonialism, Citizenship and Domesticity: Intersectionality in Feminist Histories’ Journal of Women’s History, 22(4)Winter; 315-325

[2] 317 Clare Anderson (2010) ‘(Post) Colonialism, Citizenship and Domesticity: Intersectionality in Feminist Histories’ Journal of Women’s History, 22(4)Winter; 315-325

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