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War and violence in children’s literature – references

May 13, 2011

Basically, this is another note-to-self about some texts I wanted to chase up in regards to violence in literature:

Bosmajian “Official Histories and Counter-Texts”

A past without shadow : constructing the past in German books for children / Zohar Shavit (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Gender and warfare in the twentieth century : textual representations / edited by Angela K. Smith (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Violence and the body : race, gender, and the state / edited by Arturo J. Aldama (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Using and abusing the Holocaust / Lawrence L. Langer (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Women, fire, and dangerous things : what categories reveal about the mind / George Lakoff (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Sparing the child : grief and the unspeakable in youth literature about Nazism and the Holocaust / Hamida Bosmajian (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Children’s literature and national identity / edited by Margaret Meek (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Adolescents and the media / guest editors, Victor C. Strasburger, Marjorie J. Hogan (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Historical dictionary of the “dirty wars” / David Kohut, Olga Vilella, Beatrice Julian (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Dossier secreto : Argentina’s Desaparecidos and the myth of the “Dirty War” / Martin Edwin Andersen (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Fuerte es el silencio / Elena Poniatowska (available at the University of Auckland Library)

Ocasio, Rafael ‘De las armas a los libros: idelogia sandinista y la literatura infantil-juvenil’ in La antigua. Nr 55: VI Congreso Internacional de literatura Centroamericana – Panama Nr. 55, S. 123-137

There was also an interesting looking conference in Tours in like 2006, “Stories for children, histories of childhood; Histoires d’enfant, histoires d’enfance,” with some papers scheduled which I have scanned in for future reference (and tracking down?); see Stories for Children conference details 1 and Stories for Children conference details 2

In the 2007 CLAQ, there are two articles that look relevant from Karin Westman’s description in the introduction: “Respectively, Catherine Elick and Barbara Will read the work of Hugh Lofting and Gertrude Stein through the lens of war and its concomitant upheavals in culture and the self.  Elick asks us to reconsider recent criticisms of Lofting’s Doctor Dolittle series in light of his depictions of animal communities and the series’ critique of a culture that goes to war.  For Will, Gertrude Stein’s children’s stories help us understand Stein’s overarching artistic and political concerns for children and adults on the eve of World War II and in the years of war that followed.” (p285)

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