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Maurice Gee: human judgement and growth

March 27, 2011

The Fat Man - Maurice Gee

Writing 30 years ago (one has to point out), Boyd made some interesting comments about Gee’s writing.  Thinking of the O series, The Fat Man, The Fireraiser, The Champion, etc, I think they are still comments worth bringing to a second reading of Gee’s children’s writing. Consider:

“Maurice Gee’s fiction always has two main subjects: human growth, its desirability and difficulty and cost, and the human habit of assessing other people and all too often, dismissing them merely because they happen to have grown in ways different from ourselves.”[1]

“If Gee examines the cost in sharing exacted by the diversity of human growth, he also examines the ironies of the very process of personal development: the ways people’s growth can be stunted, stifled, twisted, encouraged or revived.” [2]

“If the possibility of new growth is the great positive in Gee’s work, the chief negative force is the impulse to judge others, to condemn or dismiss those who happen to have grown up differently from oneself.” [3]


[1] P268 Brian Boyd: “Maurice Gee: Ironies of Growth and Judgement; Part I: The Early Fiction” Islands (8) 268-81. (1980)

[2] P272 Brian Boyd: “Maurice Gee: Ironies of Growth and Judgement; Part I: The Early Fiction” Islands (8) 268-81. (1980)

[3] P274 Brian Boyd: “Maurice Gee: Ironies of Growth and Judgement; Part I: The Early Fiction” Islands (8) 268-81. (1980)

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From → Gee Maurice

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