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Teaching YAs their place in the power structure

March 19, 2011

More from Roberta Seelinger-Trites:

“Everything in adolescent literature is designed to teach adolescents their place in the power structure.”[1]

 

“Ultimately, most adolescent novels carry some ideological message that reinforces the need for the adolescent to conform to the status quo.  If we believe Hollindale’s assertion that the power of adolescent literature lies in its cathartic power for the reader, then asking the reader to internalize these continued messages about the need for adolescents’ power to be limited is tantamount to destroying the adolescent readers’ potential power.  Generally speaking, most adolescent novels make this argument at an implicit ideological level that is reinforced by issues of narrative structure.  For example, adult characters are more likely to be the intradiagetic narrators who express ideological truths than are adolescents.  That is, adult narrators who are interior to the text often have more authority than intradiagetic child narrators.”[2]


[1] P480 Trites, R. S. (2001). “The Harry Potter Novels as a test case for adolescent literature.” Style 35(3, Fall): 472-485.

[2] 480-481 Trites, R. S. (2001). “The Harry Potter Novels as a test case for adolescent literature.” Style 35(3, Fall): 472-485.

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  1. Children’s lit vs. Adult lit. « Backyard Books NZ

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